Review: Fallout: New Vegas

Game: Fallout: New Vegas
Recommended price: Full Price ($20)
Metacritic Score: 84
Completion Time: 70+ hours
Buy If You Like: Fallout 3, Oblivion

The ever-important first vista shot.

The ever-important first vista shot.

When I played Fallout 3, it completely revolutionized the series to me. A storied veteran of the original Fallout, Fallout 2, and Fallout Tactics, the idea of a first-person non-grid-based combat game filled me with dread. Would it feel like Fallout? Why turn this series into a FPS?

By the end of the first hour, my fears (and free time) melted away in the vast furnace of Fallout 3’s immersive, brilliant post-apocalyptic world. I had already played games like Oblivion, but it was not until Fallout 3 that I truly appreciated the depths in Bethesda games; the ability to just strike out and roam. While it lacked the brilliant storytelling of the prior games, I felt it made up for it in all the unspoken narratives of the world around you. Suffice it to say, Fallout 3 remains in my top 5 games of all time.

This is not, of course, a Fallout 3 review.

Fallout: New Vegas is a noble attempt at having it both ways: the exploration and the narrative. You start not as a fresh-faced Vault Dweller, but as a middling Courier, shot in the head in media res ala Uma Thurman in Kill Bill. And in typical narrative-driven fashion, your quest for revenge starts at Point A and leads inexorably to Point B.

This is roaming on rails, at least for the first few dozen hours, with the slightest deviation leading to certain death. Strike North from the starting city and you will face level 20 Giant Radscorpions. Stray too far West outside the plot-directed Southerly route and Super Ghouls will eat your face off. Cut through the mountains to the East and you will inexplicably face the Blind Deathclaw guarding the path, conveniently immune to the effects of even your Stealth Boy invisibility cloak.

Decisions, decisions.

Decisions, decisions.

Between the visible fences of high-level monsters and being able to see New Vegas’s Lucky 38 tower from any vantage point in the game, F:NV starts off by feeling microscopic in comparison to Fallout 3. But a curious thing happens as you finally reach the Southern reaches of I-15 and turn East. “Tutorial Mode” over, the game suddenly opens up, blooming with hidden depth and density like some desert flower. There is still the highlighted yellow-brick plot road to follow, but you can actually strike out on your own at this point with less risk of instant death. I decided to plow my way to New Vegas proper at this point, stopping only at the various locations within sight along the way.

It ended up taking me over 40 hours just to reach the gates.

Combat in F:NV is more or less identical to Fallout 3: you can still treat the entire game as a normal FPS or you can pause the action in VATS mode to specifically target enemy extremities. Weapons skew a lot more towards traditional Spaghetti Western fare as befits the motif, but classic laser/plasma guns are not too far behind.

F:NV does feature some interesting innovations compared with its predecessor, including the use of Factions with mostly independent reputations. Don’t like the New California Republic? Join Caesar’s Legion. Or vice versa. Or screw them both and embrace Mr. House’s vision of the future. Or screw him too and embrace your own brand of justice. While the burgeoning complexities of the midgame collapses into an endgame constant, fundamentally the ending is one you can choose. Classic Fallout.

Well… mostly. While all of the set pieces are in place, including many of the same (recycled) posters last seen around the D.C. area, I could not help but feel that F:NV was… missing something. Something ephemeral, something intangible. F:NV is set in the same Fallout universe with the same people and the same post-apocalyptic problems. And perhaps that is what felt off. If this were the 1990s, F:NV would have been an expansion pack to Fallout 3, not a spiritual sequel.

I do kinda miss the Fallout 1 & 2-style depth to responses.

I do kinda miss the Fallout 1 & 2-style depth to responses.

Don’t get me wrong, there is more than enough to do in F:NV to justify its own existence. But it felt more like Fallout 3.5 than its own game. And yet, at the same time, F:NV feels like it didn’t have to be a Fallout game at all. Sure, there are Vaults and Nuka-Cola and Super Mutants aplenty. But the overarching narrative of revenge never felt personally compelling, and the coming clash between NCR and Caesar’s Legion seemed a digression. This game was Fallout when I was just wandering around, eager to scavenge what I can out of crumbling ruins I see just on the horizon. When I was the Courier just trying to make a final delivery for no particular reason? Not so much. The Platinum Chip is not too different from the Water Chip when it comes to plot McGuffins, but it felt different just the same. I wasn’t protecting my home, my family, nor was I my own person. I was… the Courier, a stranger in familiar skin, following a past everyone knows about but me.

Ultimately, Fallout: New Vegas is not Fallout 3. For some people, that will be a relief; for others, a deficiency. But it is important to keep in mind the scale of this particular comparison. I am pulling out the microscope and judging the relative merits of Mt. Everest versus the Grand Canyon. I am quantifying and comparing the love felt for a firstborn son with that for a granddaughter. Fallout: New Vegas cannot be fairly judged by a jury of its peers because it has no peers other than Fallout 3… and possibly Skyrim/Oblivion. So while I still feel that Fallout 3 is better than Fallout: New Vegas, the latter is better than damn near every other videogame I have played. I am being so critical not because Fallout: New Vegas is a bad game, but precisely because it is so good.

DLC

There are four main pieces of DLC for Fallout: New Vegas, although at this point they will all likely be bundled with any Game of the Year copy you will buy. Briefly though, I will describe them for posterity.

Honest Hearts: Technically speaking, this was my least favorite of the DLCs. Heading into the outskirts of New Caanan, the Courier gets to interact with Burning Man, the hitherto presumed-dead former leader of Caesar’s armies. While there is a main plot concerning the story of revenge/redemption, it simply does not flow too well, in my opinion. I never really cared about the plights of the tribes or the lands they occupied.

Conversely, the sort of understated plot line of “The Father in the Cave” revealed via in-game computer archives was one of the more poignant mini-narratives I have seen in Fallout, if not in games period. If you’ve chosen to never play F:NV (and are still reading this review for some reason), go read the transcript here; it is presented in the Wiki exactly as you see it in-game, aside from actually exploring some of the locations (and seeing the traps) mentioned in the text.

Outside of that, the Hearts DLC does feature a lot more plant materials for use in homemade stimpacks, and an abundance of clean drinking water for those doing a Hardcore run.

Old World Blues: Modeled on 1950s-era space dramas, I found this DLC to be exceptionally fun and funny both. The premises push the boundaries of believability even in the Fallout universe (your brain is scooped out right at the start), but after a while it ceases to be particularly relevant as you blast giant mechanical radscorpions and other ridiculous enemies. As a sort of bonus, by the end of the DLC you essentially receive a remote mountain base with all sorts of crafting stations and other amenities that you can teleport to at any time.

Dead Money: While this DLC opens up with my least favorite gaming trope – the sort of Metroid-esque “remove all your gear” mechanic – it does sort of ratchet up the tension and make the rest of the storyline work. Collared with explosives, you are forced to try and open up a vault underneath one of the few surviving casinos outside of the New Vegas area. The limited weapon selection and deadly dust clouds skews the DLC more towards survival-horror than Fallout sidequest, but I was pleased with the plot, imagery, and ultimate payoff.

Lonesome Road: Out of the four, this DLC most fits the narrative of the game proper. I felt it a smidge too linear for my liking (although not as linear as Dead Money) and a bit too ridiculous in other places (trigger nuclear bombs to move wooden debris out of your way, what?), but out of the four this most fit the tone of Fallout games.

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Posted on May 11, 2013, in Review and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Greetings! This isn’t really a reply to this…in fact, i didn’t read it at all! For some reason, i was unable to post a reply to your Bioshock Infinite ending review (which disappointed me a little bit).

    I just wanted to say that i appreciated everything that you were selling, and i definitely agreed with the whole premise if what you said. I felt exactly how you did at the end of the game. In fact, i forget when this happened (i was so disgusted after the game, i quit playing and am never going to play it again) but the part where the lutece’s say there is no reality where you did not give the baby away and you were stuck in the room and could not get out. I wanted to not give them it, and just uninstall the game–but i had the morbid curiosity to see where it went.

    I was so disappointed with the ending. It is as you say, the ending just invalidated everything you just played through. Everything you just worked for. Your life was forfeit. In fact, everything was completely meaningless. It sickened me.

    I don’t understand how people can laud this game’s ending and sit back and say that Mass Effect 3’s ending was worse. They both felt the exact same to me, invalidating everything the player just worked for.

    I don’t know if you have seen “No Country For Old Men”, but it was exactly the same for me. The end of the movie was like, “shit happens”…really? That’s the ending you came up with? I felt the exact same way with Bioshock Infinite. Which was terrible, because Bioshock (the original, though i swear bioshock 2 gets more crap than it deserved) was one of my top 5 games ever–though i hate making distinctions like that.

    Everything about the ending frustrated me. Even the game itself bothered me when compared to the first two. There was no emotional attachment. At least i never felt any. The game was also way darker than the original, even if it was in a bright sun shiny backdrop. I just did not like a lot about it….Too bad.

    Anyway! (i looked at your fallout3 review) I agree that fallout 3/ and new vegas were very good! I’m sure you have played it, but if not, Red Dead Redemption is my favorite game probably of all time. The story is actually satisfying. You actually end up loving the main character. It’s just great. I’d give it a shot if you have not.

    Take it easy! i basically just made a wordpress account to leave this comment. I may check and respond, but maybe not. I just wanted to let you know you aren’t crazy! I felt i needed to hear that too, which is why i was so glad to see your review in the first place. Have a wonderful day!

    • Thanks for the comment. I didn’t even realize that my blog settings defaulted to close new comments after 14 days. I went ahead and changed that to 60 days; I might get a bit more spam that way, but it’s worth the risk.

      I have indeed seen No Country for Old Men, and that’s an apt comparison. I was even fine with No Country’s “ending” insofar as the movie endeavors to make you feel something (depressed, in this case). But I would never suggest No Country’s plot was deep, or the best ever, or anything of the sort. Similarly, if everyone was just saying “Bioshock Infinite’s plot is a mess, but it made me feel warm and fuzzy” I wouldn’t have even written the post. But to see everyone lose their minds over its brilliance make me… it makes me lose my faith in humanity, just a bit.

      As for Red Dead, I haven’t actually played it. However! I have it on the PS3 I got over Christmas and regretfully haven’t even played. I… should probably get on that.