Facepalm of the Day

I mean… is it really so crazy to imagine that after 2000+ hours playing the same class/spec that a person might just possibly want to try something different? And, you know, not have to spend the exact same (or similar) amount of hours getting that different experience to the same content you wanted to spice up in the first place? I wanted to experience a different endgame when I rolled my alts, not a different leveling/gearing experience.

Does he really think Blizzard wouldn’t bank $1 million overnight by offering paid class changes?

It just boggles my mind. One of your stated goals is to make each class and spec feel unique, and then you become baffled that people want to play more than one. I don’t get it. Is this a joke?

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Posted on August 13, 2013, in WoW and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. It’s a poorly phrased reply but I think the gist is that, by definition, an alt is a toon that you play less than your main… if the main has the legendary, last I’ve heard, alts will be able to do the world boss. Only one toon on your account needs it. He’s only addressing one interpretation of the question but it’s Twitter… garbage in, garbage out.

    That boss will be perk for those who have the legendary &/or an incentive for players who don’t have it to get it, the catch-up rate will increase again in 5.4 for those who don’t have it and it shouldn’t be too hard to get on one toon.

  2. I’m not privy to the greater context of this conversation, but I always thought that not having to invest as much time as into your main was at least part of the point of having an alt.

  3. I don’t have “alts” any more than I have “toons”. Moreover, neither do most of the people I have played alongside over the last decade and more. The kind of people I get to know and who join the kind of guilds I’ve been in over the years have “characters”, some of which they play more often than others. I struggle to think of a single person I ever played with regularly who used that terminology or had the mindset for it.

    As far as I was aware the whole “Alt/Main” thing only ever meant anything to Raidnig guilds that took themselves seriously enough to require certain players to play certain characters if they wanted to stay in the Guild. Outside of that rarefied environment I can’t see what the concept has to offer anyone.

    • What it offers me is a different playstyle in content I am otherwise fine with. The… cadence of gameplay varies substantially between classes, even when it superficially looks similar (e.g. Ret paladin vs Arms warrior). Alts (should) represent a change of pace without a change of venue.

      Nevermind how silly things get when your main isn’t a hybrid class – surely it is not difficult to understand the desire to try healing or tanking for a change, without also having to spend 40+ hours replaying the whole of the game just to get back to the challenging bits? It’s like wanting to wear jeans to work without having to quit your job and go get hired somewhere else just to switch pants for a few hours.

      • Alts (should) represent a change of pace without a change of venue.

        AKA a subscription retention opportunity?

        surely it is not difficult to understand the desire to try healing or tanking for a change, without also having to spend 40+ hours replaying the whole of the game just to get back to the challenging bits?

        And Cataclysm’s biggest mistake rears it’s ugly head. Low level content used to be challenging, if not terribly difficult. Now the challenge, on a pve server, is to find a way to die.

      • Things may have been different in vanilla, but leveling was still easy in TBC – it just took ages. There were still elites around dungeon entrances, of course, but since you wouldn’t be running dungeons on a low-pop server without guild support anyway, they were easy enough to avoid.